Welcome

Immigrantinfo.org’s mission is to support a healthy and resilient community for everyone through successful integration of immigrants, refugees and asylees into our society. Our intention is to create a collaborative space that facilitates connection, cooperation and focus on our common goals. We invite the submission of information about news, classes, resources, and community events of interest to Santa Clara County immigrants.

COVID-19 continues to be an influence in our lives and we continue to post important news, information and resources in the COVID-19 Section.  Service Providers have been challenged to stay in sync with guidelines from the Department of Health, along with evolving needs and changing resources. We have eliminated the detailed listing of Santa Clara County ESL Classes, in order to focus on the program changes and the many local, state and national COVID relief resources.  

We continue to maintain the Immigrant Info Section, with multi-language pages with information on Disaster Preparation and Response, Immigration and Citizenship, Education, ESL Tools and Resources, the Rapid Response Network, and local Santa Clara County news and resources.

Please notify us of any necessary changes or updates to postings  on the site, so that we can keep the information current nd accurate.  Contact us at: Administrator@Immigrantinfo.org

Announcements

In the News

ADVOCACY - How to Deepen Our Compassion for Refugees
4-7-22 When we face large numbers of people in need, we almost instinctively pull back. By questioning this reaction, we can make space for a more empathic response.
CHILDREN - Santa Clara County Tackles Children’s Covid-19 Grief
2/25/22 More than one in 330 children in the state have lost at least one of their caretakers to Covid-19, a disease that has now killed more than 928,000 people nationwide. Loss is crushing for anyone, but the death of a parent or guardian carries potentially lifelong impacts for children — and could very well be one of the most enduring consequences of this pandemic.
COMMUNICATION - Affordable Connectivity Program Replacing Emergency Broadband Benefit
The Emergency Broadband Benefit is being replaced by the Affordable Connectivity Program on March 1, 2022. Those enrolled in the EBB can learn more about the transition and steps to take to stay enrolled after March 1st, by visiting fcc.gov/broadbandbenefit. Go to Affordable Connectivity Program Consumer FAQ for more information and . application form Spanish | Vietnamese | Chinese | Tagalog | Korean |
DISASTER - Cyberattack on International Committee of the Red Cross
2/4/22 Recently, a sophisticated cyberattack was detected against computer servers hosting information held by the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). The attack compromised personal data and confidential ICRC information of more than 515,000 vulnerable people, including those separated from their families due to conflict, migration and disaster, missing persons and their families, and people in detention. The attack impacted the ICRC system that the American Red Cross uses to conduct the Restoring Family Links program. The ICRC, along with the wider Red Cross and Red Crescent network, jointly runs Restoring Family Links, which seeks to reunite family members separated by conflict, disaster or migration.
DISASTER - Understanding the Impact of Extreme Heat Events
3/28/22 The Los Angeles Times recently published an article detailing the impact of heat-related deaths in California and found that extreme heat caused approximately 3,900 deaths in California over the past decade—that is six times more than the state’s official count. Even so, extreme heat receives substantially less awareness than other disasters, despite killing more Americans each year than wildfires, hurricanes, and floods.
ETHNIC - 2022 Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month
In 1978, a joint congressional resolution established Asian/Pacific American Heritage Week. The first 10 days of May were chosen to coincide with two important milestones in Asian/Pacific American history: the arrival in the United States of the first Japanese immigrants (May 7, 1843) and contributions of Chinese workers to the building of the transcontinental railroad completed May 10, 1869. In 1992, Congress expanded the observance to a monthlong celebration that is now known as Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month.
ETHNIC - 2022 SF LANGUAGE ACCESS COMPLIANCE SUMMARY REPORT
2/22 This year’s LAO report features direct feedback from community members via a comprehensive Language Access Community Survey conducted in 11 languages from June-September 2021 by OCEIA, in partnership with the IRC and the Language Access Network of San Francisco (LANSF). Survey results from over 2,000 City residents demonstrate that even with a clear commitment, a strong local language access law, and extraordinary efforts by emergency, public health and other City departments, not everyone was able to access the same information and services at the same time during a major public health crisis.
FINANCE - Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) Debt Collection Rule
11/30/21 Understand how the CFPB’s Debt Collection Rule can help you. On November 30, 2021, the Debt Collection Rule became effective. The rule clarifies how debt collectors can communicate with you, including what information they’re required to provide you.
GOVENMENT - COVID-19 Funding Stalls Over Immigration Dispute as Virus Cases Tick Up
4/8/22 For weeks, the White House has pressed Congress to pass new funding in order to keep up the federal government’s testing capabilities and purchasing power of therapeutics and vaccines. Senate negotiators struck a bipartisan agreement on Monday to replenish those funds. But a day later, the GOP blocked a procedural vote over an immigration-related public health order.
GOVERNMENT - Adult Refugee Services Unit (ARSU) newsletter #7,
April 14, 2022 The ARSU NEWSLETTER shares pertinent information relevant to the needs of Refugees and Non-citizen Crime Survivors and includes resources and updates for Refugee Cash Assistance (RCA), Entrant Cash Assistance (ECA), Refugee Social Services (RSS), Trafficking and Crime Victims Assistance Program (TCVAP), and the California Repatriation Program. Published by the CA Dept of Social Services (CA DSS).
GOVERNMENT - The importance of race, gender, and religion in naturalization adjudication in the US
3/1/22 This study examines group disparities in naturalization approvals by race/ethnicity, gender, and religion. We find that all else being equal, non-White applicants and Hispanic applicants are less likely to be approved than non-Hispanic White applicants, male applicants are less likely to be approved than female applicants, and applicants from Muslim-majority countries are less likely to be approved than applicants from other countries. In addition, we find that race/ethnicity, gender, and religion combine to produce a certain group hierarchy in terms of approval probabilities. For example, Blacks from Muslim-majority countries are much less likely to be approved than Whites from other countries. These findings underscore the continuing importance of race, gender, and religion in the making of US citizens.
GOVERNMENT - UndocuBlack: The Cruelty Behind Title 42 and Its Impact on Black Migrants
3/19/22 The official reason for the enaction of the policy by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) is to protect Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers and the public health from COVID-19, public health emergencies. And to curtail the swarm of people in congregate settings such as that in immigration detention centers. But as all harmful policies, this policy, specifically and disproportionately, affects the Black and brown immigrants who are making the treacherous journey to the U.S. seeking safety from violence, civil unrest, murder and natural disasters.
HEALTH - MEDASSIST PROGRAM
The MedAssist Program, aims to improve health outcomes and medication adherence for select individuals who reside in Santa Clara County. Qualified patients will receive financial assistance in the form of a grant designed to off-set high out-of-pocket expenses for life-saving medications such as insulin, asthma inhalers, and/or epinephrine auto-injectors. Multi-language: Spanish | Vietnamese | Chinese |
HEALTH - San Jose council ends COVID mask mandate
4/5/22 The city’s masking guidelines now align with the county and state, which lifted mask mandates earlier this year in almost all public indoor settings. The City Council unanimously approved ending local restrictions Tuesday with no discussion. Residents, regardless of vaccination status, are no longer required to wear a mask except in certain high-risk settings such as hospitals, jails, homeless shelters, long-term care facilities and on public transit.
HOUSING - With protections ending, what tenants and landlords need to know
4/1/22 After two years, four extensions and untold numbers of public and private aid programs, California’s broad safety net for renters struggling through the pandemic is being dismantled this month. Lawmakers this week extended a statewide eviction moratorium through June but only for families that have applied to the state’s emergency relief assistance program, Housing is Key. The $5.5 billion relief fund closed to new applications March 31.
IMMIGRANTS - Biden Vastly Expands “Protected Areas” Where ICE Can’t Arrest Immigrants
10/28/21 Starting this week, the number of places where immigration enforcement officials are not allowed to arrest people is growing. The Biden administration issued a new policy Wednesday that directs agents to stay away from playgrounds, domestic violence shelters, healthcare facilities, public demonstrations, disaster response centers, and other locations. The new “protected areas” policy went into effect immediately and supersedes all previous guidance for what used to be called “sensitive locations.”
IMMIGRANTS - CA has new benefits for undocumented immigrants. They’re not enough, workers say
4/3/22 Introduced last month by Assemblyman Eduardo Garcia, a Democrat from Coachella, and currently under review in the legislature, AB 2847 would create the Excluded Workers Pilot Program, a two-year program that would provide funds to undocumented workers who lose their job or have their hours reduced during the calendar year 2023. The proposal, estimated at $597 million, plus administrative costs, would allow qualifying, unemployed individuals to receive up to $300 a week for 20 weeks.
IMMIGRANTS - In Honor of Cesar Chavez Day
3/31/22 In Chavez’s words: Once social change begins, it cannot be reversed. You cannot un-educate the person who has learned to read. You cannot humiliate the person who feels pride. You cannot oppress the people who are not afraid anymore.
IMMIGRANTS - SAVE Fact Sheet - Information for SAVE Users: Afghan Arrival Categories, Documentation, and SAVE Responses
4/3/22 The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is leading and coordinating ongoing efforts across the federal government to support vulnerable Afghans, including those who worked alongside us in Afghanistan for the past two decades, as they safely resettle in the United States. These Afghan arrivals generally fall within one of four categories that are eligible for resettlement assistance, entitlement programs, and other benefits available to refugees admitted under section 207 of the Immigration and Nationality Act.
LEGAL - 5 Years Later, Families Trump's Muslim Ban Separated Are Begging Biden For Help
1/27/22 Last week, more than 100 organizations sent a letter to the Biden administration urging it to do more to relieve ongoing family separations, delays and a backlog that has likely deterred many people from even applying for U.S. visas. Key Words: Muslim Ban, immigration
LEGAL - California City Enacts Nation’s 1st Firearm Insurance Requirement
1/26/22 San Jose, California, this week became the first city in the country to require gun owners to have liability insurance coverage and to pay an annual fee. The city of 1 million residents will use those fees to invest in gun violence prevention measures.
LEGAL - Overtime Pay: Why Are Farmworkers Excluded?
2/10/22 Last week, the New York State Wage Board passed three resolutions that will finally provide overtime for farmworkers working for more than 40 hours a week. The resolutions also delineate a ten-year phase-in to ratchet down from the current 60-hour-a-week threshold to 40 hours. Immediately after the announcement, the New York Farm Bureau and other farmer-aligned organizations began rallying Governor Hochul for a reversal. Until last week, farmworkers were part of a very slim subsection of workers in New York State who lack overtime pay after 40 hours. No other industry as large as agriculture has maintained the restriction of such a basic worker right.
NEWS - San Jose’s Darlene Tenes makes sure farmworkers are appreciated
3/19/22 While efforts were made to help essential workers during the COVID-19 pandemic, one of those core groups—farmworkers—was overlooked. One woman made it her mission to change that dynamic.
RESEARCH - Drowning just below the surface: The socioeconomic consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic
11/22/21 The COVID-19 pandemic has had major economic, as well as health, impacts on every nation in the world. It has amplified existing inequalities, created new ones, and destabilized communities—reversing development gains made in recent decades. The enormous socioeconomic impacts of COVID-19 are wide-ranging and have not affected everyone equally. Throughout this pandemic, those facing the greatest vulnerabilities have been the people and groups most neglected by society—those who were already drowning just below the surface. Multi-language: Spanish | Arabic | French |
RESEARCH - The Complex Motivations and Costs of Central American Migration
11/21 Conducted in Spring 2021 amid the economic instability and changing migration policies brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, these surveys capture a snapshot of migration decision-making during a particularly dynamic period and point to important opportunities for regional collaboration. The report is the result of collaboration between MPI, the UN World Food Programme, and the Civic Data Design Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
RESOURCE - Elevate Mt. View guaranteed basic income (GBI) pilot program
2/22/22 The City Council approved over $1 million in funding for 166 families The Elevate MV pilot program will involve: **Aiding extremely low-income Mountain View families and custodial caregivers with at least one child under the age of 18. Income eligibility would be set at 30% Area Median Income (AMI). **Restricting eligibility to Mountain View residents without regard to immigration documentation and/or housing status. **Providing participants $500 a month from 12 to 24 months ($6,000 per year), serving approximately 166 families. The City anticipates applications for Elevate MV will start being accepted in the May/June timeframe through an online portal available in multiple languages.
RESOURCE - Ukraine Community Resources
3/11/22 The City of San José is closely monitoring the ongoing conflict in Ukraine and proudly stands in solidarity with Ukraine and our Ukrainian community in this extraordinarily challenging time. We are ready to support our community now and long into the future. We will continue to share resources and information as it becomes available both on this page and on our social media pages: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram. Facebook Twitter Instagram SJ Ukranian Resources Bay Area Ukrainian Resources Keu Words: TPS, Temporary Protected Status
VOTING - California Online Voter Registration
The deadline to register or re-register to vote for any election is 11:59:59 p.m. Pacific Time on the 15th calendar day before that election. If you submit an application after this time, your application will still be processed for future elections. To register online you will need: *Your CA driver license or CA identification card number * the last four digits of your social security number * your date of birth. If you do not have a California driver license or California identification card, you can still use this form to apply to register to vote by completing the online interview. Multi-langage: | Spanish | Chinese | Korean | Hindi | Tagalog | |Vietnamese | |Japanese | Khmer | Thai | Key Words:
NEWS - Fake news: Recognizing and stemming misinformation
9/17 Fake news is information that is fabricated (made up) and packaged to appear as fact. Unlike satire or other forms of humor, fake news attempts to deliberately mislead or deceive its audience, often with the goal of financial, political or other type of gain. Fake news often uses attention-grabbing headlines to draw as large an audience as possible. Being able to evaluate the accuracy of what you read or hear, and refraining from spreading false stories, will help you and others avoid the repercussions of fake news. Spanish
DEMOGRAPHICS - Census Bureau Statement on 2020 American Community Survey 5-Year Data
12/20/21 In November, the U.S. Census Bureau announced it would delay the release of the 2016-2020 American Community Survey (ACS) 5-year data, originally scheduled for December 2021,due to the impacts of COVID-19 on data collection. We continue to make progress towards a mid-to late-March 2022 data product release.
ETHNIC - San Jose mandala ceremony offers universal lesson in change
4/6/22 As chanting filled the main hall of a local Buddhist temple Sunday afternoon, San Jose resident Trang Huynh joined with about 50 people in praying and celebrating a sand mandala dissolution ceremony. The monks, assigned by the Dalai Lama, spent more than three days meticulously pouring sand by hand onto a blueprint to create the mandala. The holy ceremony ends with the breaking of the sand circle, as colorful grains of sand are swirled together into a gray pile. This symbolizes a core lesson of impermanence: Everything is bound to change and nothing lasts forever.
HEALTH - Health Equity Considerations & Racial & Ethnic Minority Groups
Health equity is when all members of society enjoy a fair and just opportunity to be as healthy as possible. Public health policies and programs centered around the specific needs of communities can promote health equity. The COVID-19 pandemic has brought social and racial injustice and inequity to the forefront of public health. It has highlighted that health equity is still not a reality as COVID-19 has unequally affected many racial and ethnic minority groups, putting them more at risk of getting sick and dying from COVID-19. Multi-language: Spanish | Vietnamese | Chinese | Korean | Social determinants of health (SDOH)
HEALTH - Older undocumented immigrants to get Medi-Cal health care in CA
6/30/21 California plans to extend Medi-Cal health coverage to some 235,000 low-income undocumented immigrants over the age of 50 – offering the most expansive health coverage in the nation to people without legal residency. The state already offers Medi-Cal health care to immigrant children and young adults under the age of 26. This latest expansion, once it receives final approval, will mean that many undocumented immigrants, except those who are 26 to 50, will be eligible.
HEALTH - A Limiting Lens: How Vaccine Misinformation Has Influenced Hispanic Conversations Online
12/8/21 It isn’t possible to tell a single story about how this vaccination gap came to be. A history of medical exploitation and discrimination may play one role [4][5]. Data shows that language barriers, as well as concerns about immigration status, childcare and work schedules may also impede access to care [6][7]. All of these factors create a foundation of doubt and mistrust that allows misinformation about Covid-19 vaccines to flourish on social media.
IMMIGRANTS - Why hundreds of thousands of kids in the US dread their 21st birthdays
"All my friends excitedly talk about turning 21 -- hitting the bars, all of that...but it's just something that I dread," she says. The day she turns 21, Parvathinathan will no longer be protected by the work visa that allowed her parents to immigrate to the United States from India. And she may face deportation. It's known as "aging out," and experts estimate that about 200,000 people like Parvathinathan are living in a similar limbo. Brought legally to the United States as children, many are scrambling to find ways to stay in the country they love. Some are forced to leave the US when they run out of options. They've dubbed themselves "documented Dreamers," and they say their plight shows how broken the US immigration system is.